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14th Native Spirit Film Festival now -15 Nov 2020

Updated: Jul 28, 2023

Credit : KaYaMentra: Sharing Truths about Menopause (Jules Koostachin)


From now to 15th November, immerse yourselves in a vast array of global Indigenous-made movies and shorts curated by the annual Native Spirit Film Festival. Buy a festival pass for an amount of your choosing and watch whenever you want for the duration of the festival at home. Native Spirit is the UK’s first and only annual festival promoting Indigenous Cinema, opening on Indigenous Peoples Day (Americas) every year, founded by Mapuche leader and artist Freddy Treuquil.


NATIVE SPIRIT DIGITAL FILM FESTIVAL

From now to 15th November, immerse yourselves in a vast array of global Indigenous-made movies and shorts curated by the annual Native Spirit Film Festival. Buy a festival pass for an amount of your choosing and watch whenever you want for the duration of the festival at home. Native Spirit is the UK’s first and only annual festival promoting Indigenous Cinema, opening on Indigenous Peoples Day (Americas) every year, founded by Mapuche leader and artist Freddy Treuquil. 

Following a successful first week — a premiere screening of Ainu – The Indigenous People of Japan (Naomi Mizoguchi) and discussion panel with Ainu cultural leaders and elders, in conjunction with Japan House, and films from Mexico and South America, this week’s programmes take us to Kanata; Indigenous Arctic (running alongside the British Museum Arctic Culture & Climate programme); Indigenous Women reMatriate, MMIWG, the inaugural #microIndigenous, films 5min +under (partnership with MicroManiaFF, NY). Looking ahead to November, the Native Spirit initiative to bring Native American Heritage Month to UK starts with the American Museum in Bath and in-person screenings in Bristol.

Festival Pass £15 unlimited views, single tickets from £3 (subject to film availability)

1 Nov 1-2pm GMT — In My Blood It Runs — don’t miss the live panel discussion linking Sydney and London, sponsored by Birds Eye View #ReclaimTheFrame. Panel host Dr William Lez Henry, Professor in Criminology and Sociology is joined by producer and barrister Larissa Behrendt (Eualeyai/Kamillaroi), William Tilmouth (Arrernte) and Director Maya Newell. In My Blood It Runs follows Dujuan, an Arrernte boy from Alice Springs, and the obstacles he faces in the Australian education system. The film is part of an extensive campaign to bring about changes in education for Aboriginal youth and for Juvenile Justice. Available to view 28 Oct-4 Nov (UK only).

22-24 Oct (worldwide) Marks of Mana by Lisa Taouma documents the ancient female art of tatau and its revitalisation by Indigenous women of Oceania. 18-25 Oct (worldwide) Jules Koostachin’s KaYaMentra: Sharing Truths about Menopause shares Cree perspectives on menopause in relation to sexuality, ageing, spirituality, and healing. In Becs Arahanga’s Hinekura, a young Māori girl, gets her first menses and embarks on the right of passage ceremony in her community that changes her relationship forever.

30 Oct Jenny Fraser (Yugambeh, Australia) screens her experimental debut and world digital premiere at Native Spirit accompanied by a one-to-one discussion with Greta Morton Elangué recorded for this event. Trouble In the Camp, 10 years in the making, weaves  a series of cinematic poems travelling through Country and through the centuries with actress/activist Ruby Wharton, before landing firmly in present-day activism.

Check the Programme now and start watching https://nativespiritfestival.festivee.com

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